Types of Monkeys

Monkey Species Index – Types of Monkeys (Overview) This article does not cover all species of monkeys, but rather shows the overall groups, subfamilies, and focuses on the more well known monkeys as well as those with unique characteristics. – Baboon Most baboons love savannah type areas; though on occasion, some baboons can do live in some tropical forests and areas. – Blue Monkey The Blue Monkey is also known as the diademed monkey.  This is considered to be an Old World monkey. – Capuchin Monkey The Capuchin monkey is considered to be a New World monkey. Capuchin monkeys can live across central and south America. – Gibbon Gibbons are large apes of the Hylobatidae family. These amazing gibbons are mostly found in south Asia such as Indonesia, Borneo, Java, China and India. – Golden Lion Tamarin The Golden Lion Tamarin can usually be found closer to coastal forests on the Atlantic Ocean. The Golden Lion Tamarin monkeys are very beautiful. – Howler Monkey The Howler Monkey is some of the biggest New World monkeys. They are some of the cutest monkeys the world has and they are distinctive. – Japanese Macaque The Japanese Macaque is known as an Old World monkey which is native to Japan. These monkeys are very much like a human. – Mandrill The Mandrill is an Old World monkey and it is considered to be one of the biggest, in fact, the biggest of all monkeys in the world today. – Marmoset Most marmoset monkeys are considered to be new world monkeys. There are twenty two different types of New World monkey species including the marmoset. – Proboscis Monkey This animal is primarily found in South East Asia, in Borneo. This is a beautiful Old World monkey is a very unique animal. – Pygmy Marmoset The Pygmy Marmoset can also be known as the dwarf monkey.  This is a new world monkey and they are a very small animal. – Rhesus Macaque The Rhesus Macaque is an Old World monkey.  This species is a very popular one found and it’s also known as the Rhesus monkey. – Spider Monkey The spider monkey’s hair is going to be very coarse and their hair can vary in colour. It can change from brown, black to gold; but their feet will be black. – Squirrel Monkey The Squirrel monkeys are considered to be new world monkeys; and they have short fur all around them. – Vervet Monkey The Vervet Monkey is a species that has been around for many years. It is considered to be an Old World monkey and is a member of the Cercopithecidae...

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Old World Monkeys

Old World Monkeys   Old World Monkeys are the group that is found in Asia and Africa. Fossils have been found in Europe, and there are still free roaming monkeys in Gibraltar, though they may have been introduced to the wild there. Most of the common, well known monkeys are in the Old World Monkey group, such as baboons, langur, and macaques. Currently at least 78 species can be found in this group, which is divided into two subfamilies. The largest being the male mandrill—females are a lot smaller—which can weigh up to 110lb and grow to be about 2.3ft in length. The smallest species in the group is the talapoin, which only weighs 1.5-2.8 lb and is 1.1-1.2 ft long. This is still considerably larger than the pygmy marmoset in South America. Physical differences are also recognizable. Most notably, their tails are completely non-prehensile and in some species very small. Their noses are also narrow with nostrils that face sideways compared to the New World Monkeys with their flat noses. All Old World Monkeys have opposable thumbs, except the colubus monkey, which only has small stumps, which aid in tree travel. All have eight premolars and most eat both carnivorous and herbivorous diets. Most monkeys in this group are not picky about food, and will eat a variety of plants, roots, seeds, nuts, insects, eggs, and other small animals. The exceptions to this are the leaf monkey, which lives mostly off of leaves and only eats a few insects and the Barbary macaque who usually eats roots and leaves and rarely eats insects. Young monkeys are born after a gestation period of five to seven months. Most monkeys are single births, with rare twins. Unlike New World Monkeys, this group is largely matrilineal, often with only one male to a tribe or troop. Females have their own cycles of fertility, so young are not born seasonally resulting in monkeys of a variety of ages in a troop. Most often, males leave the group once they are sexually mature, leaving the dominant male in charge of the other monkeys. Some species have more males in a tribe, but there is a clear hierarchical line among the males. Communication between these monkeys is very clear. Facial expressions are varied, and a number of other gestures express anger and aggression mostly. In general, this group of monkeys is more aggressive than their counterparts and less easy to tame. There are some species which can be trained and are often used for entertainment, but they are moody and never entirely domesticated. Cercopithecinae Cercopithecinae are the subfamily that is found in Africa, except the macaques, which are found in Asia, parts of Africa as well as Gibraltar. The subfamily, includes vervet monkeys, baboons, and macaques. They are found in just about every terrain and can endure a wide range of climates. The Japanese...

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New World Monkeys

New World Monkeys Monkeys are divided into two general categories: Old World Monkeys and New World Monkeys. New World Monkeys are found in Central and South America. There are several characteristics that make New World Monkeys different from Old World Monkeys, and several that are the same. They still fall under the species of monkey: a primate that is neither human or ape. The roughly 53 species of New World Monkeys living in the tropical forests of Southern Mexico, Central, and South America. Most of these monkeys are arboreal, meaning they live and travel in the trees rather than on the ground. Because of this, less is known about these monkeys as they are harder to study. New species are also being discovered, so new factors come into play often. They are most clearly defined by their flatter noses, with nostrils on the side, while Old World Monkeys have more narrow noses. Another difference is that New World Monkeys have twelve premolars, while Old World Monkeys have eight. The males and many of the females are color blind. These monkeys are also the only ones in the world that have prehensile tails, meaning they can use their tails to hold on to branches for balance and swinging. Other monkeys do not have the use of this “third hand” as their tails are either short or non-prehensile. New World Monkeys are monogamous in their pairing and care for the young together. The New World Monkeys are divided into five main families: – Cebidae which include capuchin and squirrel monkeys – Callitrichidae which include marmosets and tamarins – Aotidae which include titi and night monkeys – Atelidae which include spider, woolly and howler monkeys – Pitheciidae which include sakis, titis and uakaris The Callitricidae family consists of marmosets and tamarins. Even though their thick furs and long tails make them look larger, they are the smallest of all monkeys. Marmosets are the smallest monkeys, but all the monkeys in this group range from 5-32 oz. This monkey family is least like other monkeys. They have claws instead of nails on all their fingers and toes except for their big toe. Other differences include the inability to change facial expressions the way other monkeys do. Babies are usually born in pairs rather than single births as in other monkey groups. They also lack the opposable thumbs that are prevalent in other monkeys. Groups of this type of this type of monkey are typically smaller, usually only five or six animals in a tribe, with both the male and female animals involved in care of the young. Male animals will often carry the babies around until feeding time when they are handed to the mother. Male members of the tribe are very involved with the young and will groom, comfort, protect, and even play with the offspring. A tribe is generally composed of...

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Monkeys

Monkeys

Monkeys Haplorrhini suborder Monkeys Facts and Information. Feeding, habitat, distribution, reproduction, anatomy and more. Facts about Capuchin Monkeys, Mandrills, Baboons, Spider Monkeys and others. Introduction To Monkeys The definition of monkeys is any primate that is not human or ape. Monkeys are divided into two subspecies: Old World Monkeys and New World Monkeys. Old World monkeys are found in Africa and Asia, while New World monkeys live in Central and South America. In general, monkeys can be recognized because they have tails, while apes do not. However, this isn’t always the case and some monkeys have been incorrectly labeled as apes. Class  Mammalia Order  Primates Suborder  Haplorhini Infraorder  Simian There are currently about 260 living species of monkey, with more species in Brazil than any other country. The Amazon basin is home to over 80 species with new ones being discovered all the time. The Democratic Republic of Congo currently has the second largest amount of species, and the most in the African continent. In many areas, monkeys are being threatened by extinction due to deforestation and the need for people to use land for crops and pasture lands. In some areas, monkeys are considered pests because they eat crops or food intended for cattle. Monkeys are highly intelligent animals, learning and adapting quickly. Some use basic tools and many can be taught to obey basic commands. Some monkeys are used in entertainment, by doing tricks, performing, etc. However, monkeys can also be used to help humans. One example is their use in helping quadriplegic persons to perform everyday tasks, such as switching on lights, fetching objects, feeding, and even personal care. Monkeys eat a variety of things and are not limited to either only herbivore or carnivore diets. Most monkeys eat fruit, nuts, leaves, berries, eggs, and small animals, including spiders and insects. The largest monkeys are the mandril monkeys, with a male getting to be up to 3.3ft long and can weigh up to 79lb. These colorful monkeys live in areas of Africa and are closely related to baboons. The tiny pygmy marmoset, which is an Old World monkey, is the smallest of the species. It can be as small as only 4.6 in with a 6.8 in tail. This adorable monkey weighs only 3.5 oz and is sometimes kept as a pet, though it doesn’t always adapt well and should be left in the wild. Communication among monkeys is something that has been studied extensively. They use a number of ways to communicate, including body movements, sounds, and facial expressions. These communication methods extend farther than just mating, but express affection, anger, danger signals, and contribute to the social order of things. The loudest of the monkeys are howler monkeys, which can be heard up to two miles in forested areas and three miles in open spaces. There seems to be a clear hierarchical system in many monkey species,...

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